Can World's Rarest Bear Be Saved?

I love to find stories about organizations and people that are putting forth an effort to mitigate some of the anthropocentric repercussions of our modern civilization.

Fewer than three dozen Gobi bears survive in one of the harshest places on Earth.

This large male was documented visiting all three oases in the Gobi A preserve, evidence that the bears are still breeding across their range.   Douglas Chadwick   has traveled to some of the world’s most remote corners to report stories for  National Geographic.  Both he and photographer   Joe Riis   are trained wildlife biologists.

This large male was documented visiting all three oases in the Gobi A preserve, evidence that the bears are still breeding across their range. Douglas Chadwick has traveled to some of the world’s most remote corners to report stories for National Geographic. Both he and photographer Joe Riis are trained wildlife biologists.

See the full story here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/special-features/2014/04/140417-rarest-bears-world-mongolia-gobi/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=inside_20140501&utm_campaign=Content

 

I especially like to read the comments people make about these stories, It shows a strong collective environmental ethic.

 

Whilst I don't know if writing about problems is the best way to deal with them, it sure helps to better understand the problems of our world and it is inspiring to know that people care deeply about our relationship to the natural environment.