Press Release: Rob Hollis awarded the 2017 AIA 10 - Craftsmanship Architectural Award

 

Rob Hollis of CEDC Wins 2017 AIA10 Award

Awards honor the best design work from emerging professionals in the state of Colorado

 

Lakewood, CO (08/07/2017) – The Colorado Environmental Design Company (CEDC) is proud to announce Rob Hollis as a 2017 AIA10 Award Winner, presented by the American Institute of Architects Colorado Chapter (AIA Colorado). The awards program honors the best design work from emerging professionals in the architecture industry, and is open to students, design professionals and architects licensed 10 years or less. 

 

Winners in 14 categories were selected by a jury of architects that included:

Ben Blanchard, AIA – Anderson Mason Dale Architects, PC

Cindy Harvey – RNL

Julian Lineham – Studio NYL

Julianne Scherer, AIA – HDR

Mark Tremmel, AIA – Tremmel Design Group

 

Rob is an Associate AIA member with 2.5 years of NCARB experience with Greenline Architects and POSS Architecture and Planning, both of the Roaring Fork Valley in Colorado. The “Dream Hostel” model was built for fourth year undergraduate studio instructed by Dr. Ping Xu at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

 

This marks the 18th year AIA Colorado has recognized the work of emerging professionals through a dedicated awards program. Other 2017 AIA10 Award winners include:

 

Portfolio

Highlighting the design and creative achievements through work represented in a portfolio.

 

Winner: Matthew Miller Portfolio

Matthew Miller

University of Cincinnati

 

Honorable Mention: Jesse Ledin Portfolio

Jesse Ledin, AIAS

University of Colorado Denver

 

Craftsmanship – Architectural

Highlighting the craftsmanship, technique and creative ability exhibited through architectural models.

 

Winner: Dream Hostel

Rob Hollis, Assoc. AIA

 

LINK TO VIDEO HERE

 

Honorable Mention: Sculpted Space

Matthew Miller

University of Cincinnati

 

Craftsmanship – Artistic

Highlighting the craftsmanship skill, technique and creative ability exhibited through any physical artistic medium including furniture design, object or ornament design, sculpting, woodworking, pottery, photography, sketches, water colors, journals, painting, metal work, etc.

 

Winner: Whale Chair

Christopher M. Smith, AIA

4240 Architecture

 

Honorable Mention: Curtis Street View

Stephanie Wood & Kathryn Mullinax

University of Colorado Denver

 

Unbuilt Architecture – Under 20,000 SF

Recognizing the outstanding design achievement of a project under 20,000 SF that has not been built.

 

Winner: Still Water Pavilion

Tanner Morrow & Bernard Jeffers

University of Colorado Denver

 

Unbuilt Architecture – Over 20,000 SF

Recognizing the outstanding design achievement of a project over 20,000 SF that has not been built.

 

Winner: Tokyo Vertical Cemetery

Kevin Sietmann & Brian Martin

Tomecek Studio Architecture

 

Honorable Mention: Rocky Mountain Public Media Center

Michael Krause, Assoc. AIA

Tryba Architects

 

Honorable Mention: Scandinavian Designs – Corte Madera

Iassen Vladimirov, Assoc. AIA & Caitlin Pfarr

Roth Sheppard Architects

 

Built Architecture – Under 20,000 SF

Recognizing the outstanding design achievement of a project under 20,000 SF that has been built.

 

Winner: Old Pond Residence

Todd Kennedy, AIA

Additional team members: Rich Carr, AIA, Gage Reese, Maura Trumble, AIA, Wren Hoffman

CCY Architects

 

Interior Architecture

Recognizing exceptional interior architectural design.

 

Winner: Gensler Denver

Alex Garrison, AIA & Jonas Phillipsen

Additional team members: Jon Gambrill, AIA, Brent Mather, AIA, Jay McFarland, Lindsay Masteller, Gretchen Bustillos, Anni Hurt, Beth Mosenthal, AIA

Gensler

 

Most Sustainable Project

Recognizing the outstanding design achievement of a built project featuring the most creative and successful sustainable design strategies with recordable production.

 

Winner: ECE

Christopher Kleingartner, AIA, Coty Sandberg, Adam Riddle, Ann Cosgrove, Joe Barnes, J.B. Park

SmithGroupJJR

 

Historic Preservation

Recognizing the outstanding design achievement in the preservation, rehabilitation, restoration or reconstruction of a historic property.

 

Winner: Hotel Jerome

Delvon Nemechek, AIA & Sarah Broughton, AIA

Rowland+ Broughton Architecture/Urban Design/Interior Design

 

Honorable Mention: Wyoming State Capitol Exterior Restoration

Cat Brown, Assoc. AIA

HDR Architecture

 

Creative Concept

Recognizing the exceptional creative concept of a designed object including furniture, industrial design, product prototypes, architectural elements, digital media or digital fabrication.

 

Winner: The Laundry Truck

Dorothy Ma

Radian Inc.

 

The AIA10 Award

Highlighting an emerging professional who has displayed outstanding achievements in the field of design or allied arts, community involvement and dedication to the profession in Colorado.

 

Winner: Christopher Kleingartner, AIA

HDR Architecture

 

Community Legacy Award

Recognizing the community involvement or service initiative organized by an individual or group of individuals that leverages their architectural skills, values and dedication to the profession.

 

Winner: Radian Inc.

Tim Reinen, Assoc. AIA & Dorothy Ma

 

Best of Section Awards

Recognizing the most creative solution to a design problem in the form of a built work of architecture in each AIA Colorado section.

 

AIA Denver Winner: Aperture

Brian Dale, AIA & Meredith Dale

Additional team members: Dave Whittingham, Chris Dale, John Hastings

Sort Studio

 

AIA Colorado North Winner: Brick City House

Michael Piche', AIA

Additional team members: Scott Lindenau, FAIA, Susan Okie, Joey Pruett

Studio B Architecture + Interiors

 

AIA Colorado South Winner: Marman Observatory

Ryan Lloyd, AIA

Echo Architecture

 

AIA Colorado West Winner: Old Pond Residence

Todd Kennedy, AIA

Additional team members: Rich Carr, AIA, Gage Reese, Maura Trumble, AIA, Wren Hoffman

CCY Architects

 

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About AIA Colorado

For 125 years, AIA Colorado has been the voice of the architectural profession in Colorado. As a membership organization for architects, those working towards licensure and allied industry professionals, AIA Colorado provides education and resources for its members and tools for the public to find and work with architects. With more than 2,400 members statewide, AIA Architects are dedicated to the highest standards of professionalism, integrity, and competence. AIA Colorado is a state chapter of the national American Institute of Architects. www.aiacolorado.org.

 

 

 

BLACK MARKET IS BACK IN ASPEN FOR THE WEEKEND

BLK MKT and ROAM come through Aspen with a bang... and a conscience.

The BLK MKT Team has set up in Boogie's Aspen for Labor Day weekend

The BLK MKT Team has set up in Boogie's Aspen for Labor Day weekend

BLK MKT first appeared in Aspen at the Crystal Palace building where Testosterone now lives, the shop looked like a cave filled with gems made of wood, brass and leather. A year later, the guys are back in town, with a load of goods unloaded from their '86 diesel box truck into Boogie's for Labor day weekend. A pop - up shop to say the least, Black Market, with their line of clothing called ROAM, has turned the Boogies lobby into a modern day museum of high-quality, hand-crafted clothing with a conscience. Check them out all weekend at Boogie's 534 E. Cooper Ave.

Sam and Mike, the founders of BLK MKT and ROAM

Sam and Mike, the founders of BLK MKT and ROAM

Interview with Sam of BLK MKT as they pass through and set up shop in Aspen, Colorado.

The Oculus is Innocuous

A small structure with low energy and a big impact.

The Oculus was built off-grid with over half of the materials brought in on bikes by the build crew.

After experiencing great acclaim for the Crystal River Tree House in 2004, Green Line Architects of Carbondale, CO had set aim on something much more foresighted for 2015. Tree houses, by and large, are a novelty. They don’t last any longer than the tree they are settled in, they are tremendously inefficient from a building operations standpoint and not to mention very inaccessible, think ADA. Green Line wanted to look carefully at the today and the future of architecture.

 

A Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) showed that over a fifty year life-span The Oculus will consume less than half of the energy than that of a regular dwelling. 


In the future, our building codes will be modified as dramatically as our medicinal and agricultural practices, organic and holistic will rule. Our building materials will be stamped with a nutritional facts statement including the method of extraction, the material content, the transportation impacts and the application and procedural guidelines. In the future, people will ask, “have you seen your local architect this month?” After all, our three basic needs include food, water and shelter.

 

The (LCA) includes the types of materials used in the building, their recycled content, how far they traveled and how they were extracted.


    The environmental movement is shifting. It has become an issue about human survival on this planet as opposed to simply the protection of the environment. We now know that if we don’t regulate or land use and resource management, this planet will shake us off like water on a wet dog. In the future, humans will either perish, or learn to become part of the natural system. 

 

The Oculus requires very little energy on a daily basis, with solar electric, solar in-floor radiant heating, an overhang for shade in the summer and glass on the sun-facing side for winter warmth. 


    Products are created all around the world, and the earth is where the materials comes from, someone may say that the world has a restorative power and that no matter what we do, we will not play a role in it’s events, as if the world is on a different timeline or pattern. Which is true, in terms of the existence of the planet compared to the existence of our societies. But in terms of the relationship that we have right now, that relationship that we have with nature and the earth is inextricably linked to now and everything else living right now. We must consider our relationship to nature as a life giving force.

 

The entire build was filmed for a 1-hour TV special called Building Off-Grid: Rocky Mountains. 


    Products can be created in one of two ways, manufactured or crafted. Think leather, someone might say that leather is bad, bad for the environment and otherwise, maybe they have seen videos of production farms. On the other hand, there is a native in his cave at the dawn of time, using tools to benefit from every single piece of his kill, creating clothing and fabrics out of the hides. Still they are linked, linked to the natural system, animals, humans, very different in their actions but doing the same thing. Life is a natural force, but it can be mechanized, or organized, always relative to the other pieces, bad input results in bad output.

Oh yeah, the building is also a bike ramp..

See more about this project at; whatistheoculus.com & GreenLine Architects

Watch the TV show for $2.99 in HD at; YouTube

Photos by; Brent Moss

Furniture by; Brad Reed Nelson

Text by me, Rob, you can reach me at zzzrob.hollis@gmail.com

Rob Hollis featured of LifeProof live blog.

Recently, Rob Hollis wrote a blog post for LifeProof and was featured on their LifeProof Live Tumblr blog as well as their Instagram page. The article was written about a 14er trip, where Rob and some friends summited Mt. Elbert, Colorado's tallest fourteener. 

Check it; LifeProof Live

Here are some sneak peak photos taken by Riley Seebeck of Steamboat Colorado...

Rob on his way up Mt. Elbert at dawn, slightly unprepared mind you...

Rob on his way up Mt. Elbert at dawn, slightly unprepared mind you...

Rob on his way down the 9-mile downhill, well prepared for this leg of the journey. 

Rob on his way down the 9-mile downhill, well prepared for this leg of the journey. 

Green Line Architects goes viral

A behind the scenes look of a Green Line project was picked up by the Associated Press last week and the story circulated around the nation. The project is still under wraps, but what we can tell you is that the whole thing is being filmed for a one-hour TV special. 

Follow these links for more info;

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/aug/15/group-of-cyclists-building-tiny-off-grid-house-in-/?page=all

http://offgridinsights.com/bikers-building-off-grid/

http://ksno.net/feature-friday-glenwood-stomparallas-talk-to-ksno/

Stay tuned!

A fresh perspective on design.

Dr. Temple Grandin consults with Green Line Architects on two new designs. 

Green Line Architects was honored to spend the day with one of Time Magazine's "100 Most Influential People in the World" last Tuesday, Dr. Temple Grandin. Temple began her day at Sustainable Settings Ranch in Carbondale, Colorado, were she advised the new design and cow-handling plan of Green Line's proposed Dairy Barn project. Grandin's input helped Green Line staff to understand design details that will reduce stress on the animals and improve the working environment for Sustainable Settings young group of gardeners, ranch-hands and activists.

 

Sustainable Settings is a poster child for the future of farming; permaculture, integrated pest management, intern work-study programs and community involvement.

Photo of "Ruby" the dairy cow and from left to right; Marci Krivonen from Aspen Public Radio, Sally Bernard from Ascendigo, Dr. Temple Grandin from Colorado State University and Brook LeVan from Sustainable Settings. Photo by Rob Hollis from Green Line Architects.

Photo of "Ruby" the dairy cow and from left to right; Marci Krivonen from Aspen Public Radio, Sally Bernard from Ascendigo, Dr. Temple Grandin from Colorado State University and Brook LeVan from Sustainable Settings. Photo by Rob Hollis from Green Line Architects.

 

After a farm-to-table meal at the ranch, we were excited to have Dr. Grandin come back to downtown Carbondale and tour The Yellow House. The Yellow House, designed in partnership with Ascendigo, an adult adventure camp for youth and adults across the autism spectrum, is a home for up to three autistic individuals to begin to gain independence and skills in their pursuits of a fulfilling life. Temple was excited to see that the home had all the infrastructure and capabilities of a medical facility, yet the feel and look of a comfortable home. Temple was also thrilled to see that the design included a wi-fi master shutoff and the absence of TVs in the bedrooms, concluding "your (sons and daughters) are not going to develop if they don't get outside the house and learn to help other people."

 

Dr. Temple Grandin was very helpful in consulting on these two projects with Green Line Architects. You can see the two talks she did for the community, at the end of a very long day, online at Grassroots TV:

 

http://www.grassrootstv.org/view?showID=13477

http://www.grassrootstv.org/video/temple-grandin-autism-and-my-sensory-based-world

 

Thanks to our partners Sustainable Settings and Ascendigo for helping to bring Temple to the Roaring Fork Valley.


http://sustainablesettings.org/

http://ascendigo.org/

 

NEW POSITION FOR ROB HOLLIS

Rob has recently accepted a job offer with GreenLine Architects of Carbondale Colorado! This position as Junior Designer will allow Rob to develop his architectural skills and expertise on the topic of triple bottom line architectural solutions while being located in the mecca of action sports; The Roaring Fork Valley. Please take a look at GreenLine's webpage and portfolio of high-performance sustainable design solutions;

http://greenlinearchitects.com

Here is a picture of Rob on his first day in front of the GreenLine office.

Here is a picture of Rob on his first day in front of the GreenLine office.

Architecture for Humanity

Stumbled across some old bookmarks today and was reminded of an organization called Architecture for Humanity, they are out of San Francisco and seem to work on projects all over the world. They focus on a "need" based strategy, where they respond to disaster, global issues or community request. 

"How We Do It: The Best Solutions are local solutions"  http://architectureforhumanity.org/about/how-we-do-it

"How We Do It: The Best Solutions are local solutions"

http://architectureforhumanity.org/about/how-we-do-it

Can World's Rarest Bear Be Saved?

I love to find stories about organizations and people that are putting forth an effort to mitigate some of the anthropocentric repercussions of our modern civilization.

Fewer than three dozen Gobi bears survive in one of the harshest places on Earth.

This large male was documented visiting all three oases in the Gobi A preserve, evidence that the bears are still breeding across their range.   Douglas Chadwick   has traveled to some of the world’s most remote corners to report stories for  National Geographic.  Both he and photographer   Joe Riis   are trained wildlife biologists.

This large male was documented visiting all three oases in the Gobi A preserve, evidence that the bears are still breeding across their range. Douglas Chadwick has traveled to some of the world’s most remote corners to report stories for National Geographic. Both he and photographer Joe Riis are trained wildlife biologists.

See the full story here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/special-features/2014/04/140417-rarest-bears-world-mongolia-gobi/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=inside_20140501&utm_campaign=Content

 

I especially like to read the comments people make about these stories, It shows a strong collective environmental ethic.

 

Whilst I don't know if writing about problems is the best way to deal with them, it sure helps to better understand the problems of our world and it is inspiring to know that people care deeply about our relationship to the natural environment.